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Upcoming

2014 Earth and Ocean Festival
Kailua-Kona, Hawai‘i Island
April 12, 2014

The Seventh Annual School Learning Garden Symposium
Waimea, Hawai‘i Island
June 7, 2014

ʻĀINA In Schools Garden & Nutrition Curriculum Training
Waimea, Hawai‘i Island
June 8, 2014

Kū ‘Āina Pā Summer Intensive
Waimea, Hawai‘i Island
June 9-11, 2014

Waimea School Garden Tours
Waimea, Hawai‘i Island
June 12, 2014

Natural Farming Certification Course
Kailua-Kona, Hawai‘i Island
June 17-21, 2014





Recent News

The Honaunau School garden, run by Melissa Chivers and Jessica Sobocinski, is more than just a place where flowers and vegetables grow; it is a living classroom where students and teachers can observe, interact with, and learn about the natural world that is responsible for supporting human existence on this planet.
more

Almost two years since it was completed, The Kohala Center’s Health Impact Assessment on Hawaii County’s Agriculture Plan has garnered national attention and helped produce meaningful effects on the local food system.
more



© 2008-2014 The Kohala Center
All rights reserved.

Archived News 2006 - 2010

Island Naturals teams with The Kohala Center
December 14, 2010


Island Naturals Market & Deli joins with The Kohala Center to say happy holidays by offering a 10 percent in-store discount to everyone who becomes a member of the center’s Circle of Friends now through January. The introductory membership offer includes the one-time discount, participation in a drawing for a $300 Island Naturals Market shopping spree, and special rates for The Kohala Center’s learning events that take Friends on tours of sustainable farms or introduce them to the unique flora, fauna, and landscapes of our island

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii 247



Planting seeds of good health
By Colin M. Stewart
December 10, 2010

Waimea school's 'Crop Share' aims to make fresh produce accessible A stroll through Waimea Middle School's Mala'ai culinary garden can start your stomach rumbling. Artichoke. Green beans. Tomatoes. Lemongrass. Onions. Arugula. Chili peppers. Cucumbers. Sunchokes. Spinach. Cilantro. The list goes on and on. As one of the largest and most ambitious school gardens on the island, Mala'ai has helped spark a movement to emphasize sustainability and farming practices in daily lesson plans across the state.

» read more

Used with permission from the Hawaii Tribune-Herald



Kaiser supports produce exchange program
December 9, 2010


Kaiser Permanente has presented a $5,000 grant to The Kohala Center to support the establishment of a surplus fresh produce exchange program – called Crop Share – at Malaai Garden: The Culinary Garden at Waimea Middle School. Crop Share provides the opportunity for community members to bring surplus produce from their farm or garden to exchange with other community members.

» read more


Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii 247



5 more Cabinet members named
Abercrombie taps two Maui County finance officials to lead the state tax department
By Derrick DePledge
December 5, 2010

Gov.-elect Neil Abercrombie yesterday filled more slots in his Cabinet, turning to the Maui budget director to lead state tax policy and the former state Senate vice president to handle agriculture. Abercrombie nominated Fred Pablo, Maui budget director, as director of the state Department of Taxation... He also added Guy Kaulukukui, associate director for strategic partnerships at The Kohala Center, a Big Island research group, as deputy director of the state Department of Land and Natural Resources.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from the Star Advertiser



Back to basics
Chefs challenge youths to plant gardens and think fresh, not processed, when it comes to food choices
By Joleen Oshiro
December 1, 2010

Children faced with challenge have existed since the beginning of time. But fundamental health issues plaguing today's youth are unprecedented: Obesity and diabetes, once rare in children, are epidemic. While a variety of factors come into play, diets of processed food and sedentary lifestyles are two of the largest contributors to the phenomenon. These have not only affected children's physical well-being, but their knowledge and awareness of fresh food, their connection to the natural world - and, by default, the health of the planet.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from the Star Advertiser



School gardens
'The garden echoes what happens in the classroom'
by Lisa Marie Dahm
November 28, 2010

With hands deep in the soil, students at Kona Pacific Public Charter School in Kealakekua spend time twice a week in their 6,000-square-foot garden. Their garden teacher, Barrow Hutchison, is right there with them, teaching them everything from planting and harvesting to building a shed. They even learned how to build an electric fence to keep pigs out. It might seem like innocent fun, but beyond learning to grow and even eat eggplant and squash, the students are applying what they've learned in math, science, reading and social studies in a hands-on way.

» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

Save energy, lower your electric bill
November 15, 2010


The Kohala Center and the county Department of Research and Development invite Hawaii residents to participate in a free residential energy efficiency workshop. “How to Save Energy and Lower Your Electric Bill” will be offered 5:30-8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 9, at Tutu’s House in Waimea. Since no two households are exactly the same and can differ greatly from one another, this workshop will help participants evaluate possible energy saving measures for their own home.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii 247



Free CFL bulbs available in Hilo, Kona (Oct. 16)
October 14, 2010


The Kohala Center, Hawaii Energy, and the County of Hawaii invite the public to pick up free Compact Florescent Light (CFL) bulbs and energy efficiency information in Hilo and Kona from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Oct 16, while supplies last. Some 1,700 bulbs will be given away on a first-come, first-served basis in front of the Hilo Walmart and outside of KTA in the Kona Coast Shopping Center and Safeway in the Kona Crossroads Shopping Center.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii 247



Free CFL Bulbs
October 12, 2010

The Kohala Center, Hawaii Energy, and the County of Hawai‘i invite the public to pick up free Compact Florescent Light (CFL) bulbs and energy efficiency information in Hilo and Kona from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, October 16, while supplies last. Some 1,700 bulbs will be given away on a first-come, first-served basis in front of the Hilo Walmart and outside of KTA in the Kona Coast Shopping Center and Safeway in the Kona Crossroads Shopping Center.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Guava Bee



Checkup for Kahalu‘u: Study looks at health of bay
By CHELSEA JENSEN
September 25, 2010


Kahalu‘u Bay is a unique place that affords oceangoers the opportunity to experience a marine habitat like no other in the state, marine biologist Kaipo Perez III said Friday in Keauhou. "This is a very special place and because of that it has always attracted a lot of tourists who come here for snorkeling, which has raised the community's concern regarding sustainability of the area," said Perez, who has spent the past nine months studying the bay. "It is a really rare place to have the ability to go out and within knee-deep water see coral."

» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

Native plant presumed extinct; found at Parker Ranch September 2, 2010

A Hawaiian plant species that had not been seen in a century and which was presumed extinct has been discovered on Parker Ranch lands in the Kohala region. Staff from The Nature Conservancy made the discovery earlier this summer in an upland rainforest on the slopes of Kohala volcano.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii 247



Garden teachers cultivate new ideas
Big Isle conference draws instructors from across Hawaii
By MELISSA TANJI
August 22, 2010


A single harvest of corn yielded many lessons for Sacred Hearts School students last week. After picking hybrid Indian corn from the school garden, the students were counting kernels that came in yellow, blue, dark brown and a rainbow of other colors. "Today we were doing math with corn. Corn math," science enrichment teacher Ed Mahoney said Thursday.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from The Maui News



An outdoor education
Outdoor science education program for island students
August 18, 2010

Island students and their teachers will have the chance again this year to leave the classroom and study firsthand ahupua‘a (watersheds) of Hawai‘i Island. The Kohala Center is recruiting teachers for its second year of HI-MOES--Hawai‘i Island Meaningful Outdoor Experiences for Students, an innovative hands-on science-based program that focuses on bay and watershed education in ahupua'a of the Kona coast, Kohala Mountain and Hilo Bay.

» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly



Have I Taught You Well Enough? Instilling an Environmental Ethic.
August 11, 2010

Have I taught you well enough? Spoken softly by Kumu Pua Case, these powerful words left a strong impact on the circle of teachers standing in the foothills of the Waimea mountains in the summer of 2010. Have I taught you well enough to make the decisions for the future of our island? Have I taught you well enough to make the decisions on where, what type and how much development? Have I taught you well enough to make the decisions on land use and resource use?

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Nature Talks



VIDEO: Hawaiians net fishing knowledge at Lawai‘a Ohana Camp
August 1, 2010

Video by David Corrigan

15 island children and their families enjoyed a hands on Hawaiian fishing experience at the Lawai‘a ‘Ohana Camp this week. The camp attracted families from across the island for the free, four day event. The local fisherman learned how to make and use a throw-net, prepare and rig a bamboo pole, identify fish, monitor water quality, clean and cook fish, and practice sustainable fishing methods.

Click here to view the video online.

Used with permission from bigislandvideonews.com



Lawaia Ohana Camp promotes sustainable fishing practice
August 2
, 2010

The first of its kind family fishing camp gave more than a dozen youngsters something special to write about when they get that dreaded back-to-school assignment: What Did You Do This Summer? Last week, 15 Big Island youth ages 10 to 15 and their families were invited to camp at Kaupulehu Interpretive Center at Kalaemano, a historical fishing area to learn about sustainable approaches to preserving and managing Hawaii’s marine life.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from the Hawaii247.com



Green lessons from Mauka to Makai in Hawaii

By Ramon Lorenzo Luis Rosa Guinto
August 2, 2010

It was 5 a.m. and, while the sun was still asleep in the horizon, the Kilauea—the world’s most active volcano—continued to emit a grey sulfuric miasma. As part of native Hawaiian protocol, we poured on the a’a lava an herbal extract as an offering to Pele, the volcano goddess, to seek her permission to enter the crater. We sang a song chronicling the birth of the eight major Hawaiian islands, a hymn that seemed to please the deity. We also chanted E ala e to the sun until it “woke up” and emerged from behind the clouds.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from the Philippine Daily Inquirer



Smart by Nature: School garden teachers gather in Waimea

July 16, 2010

Dozens of school garden teachers are gathering this weekend on the Big Island for the 3rd annual Hawaii School Garden Teacher Conference. The conference at Waimea Middle School’s Malaai Culinary Garden runs through Sunday, July 18 and features guest speakers from Center for Ecoliteracy, a Berkeley, Calif.-based company focused on the education for sustainable living.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from the Hawaii247.com

Hawai‘i County Study Ties Health to Agriculture
July 2010

Hawaii County is one of five sites in the U.S. selected for a Health Impact Assessment. The Kohala Center has received a $150,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and The Pew Charitable Trusts to develop the Health Impact Assessment of the Hawaii County Agricultural Development Plan recommendations.

» read more

Used with permission from KauCalendar.com

Territorial land laws and issues to be examined in a new book
UH doctoral scholar Iaukea refers to writings of her ancestor
June 30, 2010

University of Hawaii doctoral scholar and Mellon Hawaii Fellow Sydney Iaukea has signed a contract with the University of California Press to publish a book based on her 2008 doctoral dissertation, "E Paa Oukou: Holding and Remembering Hawaiian Understanding of Place and Politics."

» read more

Used with permission from the Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Environmental scholars from Asia study island sustainability
June 22, 2010

A group of 20 undergraduate scholars from Burma, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand visited Hawaii Island June 2–8 as part of a U.S. Department of State-sponsored innovative environmental leadership program hosted by the East-West Center.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from the Hawaii247.com

Need for Seed
by Chelsea Jensen
June 20, 2010

Maintaining Hawaii Island's agricultural diversity is dependent on residents sharing seeds, and the Hawaii Island Seed Exchange provides the venue for people to do
just that.

"The seed exchange is a time for everyone to come together and exchange seeds from different parts of a island and learn about the work that each other is doing," said event coordinator Nancy Redfeather. "We need to preserve agricultural diversity because it's important to keep a lot of varieties of food going because that contributes to the health of agriculture overall."

» read more

Used with permission from the West Hawaii Today

Here's a bright idea
4-Hers to switch bulbs -- new for old -- in Waimea

June 17, 2010

The light switch is on.

Take five incandescent lightbulbs to the Mealani Research Station in Waimea Saturday and trade them for five free compact fluorescent lightbulbs. Each family can turn in five of the old-style bulbs for five of the new
energy-saving lightbulbs.

» read more

Used with permission from the Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Creating healthier communities by managing ag
By Roger Harris & Diane Koerner
June 16, 2010

How can the island best develop its agricultural industry?

After two years of analysis and review, the 2010 Hawaii County Agricultural Development Plan has been approved by the county's Research and Development Department and is now ready for formal review by the Hawaii
County Council.

» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly

Historian Noelani Arista lays out aspects of her groundbreaking research on first contact between
Euro-Americans and Hawaiians
June 9, 2010

Noelani Arista has received the prestigious 2010 Allan Nevins Prize from the Society of American Historians, a rare nod to a native American historian doing groundbreaking work on native history.

Click here to listen to the interview online.

Used with permission from Noe Tanigawa of Hawaii Public Radio

James Takamine Named Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union CEO
By Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union
June 9, 2010

Big Island of Hawaii – The Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union Board of Directors has named James M.K. Takamine as its President and CEO. Takamine was previously the Hawaii Island Regional Executive with American Savings Bank.

» read more

Media release courtesy of Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union

School of the Soil
By David Thompson
June 2010

Pua Mendoca knows who's been nibbling holes in the leaves of her taro, eggplant and basil. Mendoca is the kumu kahua mala, or school garden instructor, at a charter school in Hilo called Ka ‘Umeke Ka‘eo. The culprits nibbling on the leaves? They're the Chinese rose beetles that recently discovered the school's raised vegetable beds. But Kumu Pua, as the children call her, has a plan to end the beetles' schoolyard feast. It involves worms and kindergartners.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hana Hou!

Kohala Center joins a national race to help our keiki stay healthy
By Beth-Ann Kozlovich
May 28, 2010

HONOLULU—The Kohala Center on Hawaii Island will partner with The Center for Ecoliteracy in California and Kaiser Permanente on a July conference to help teachers help kids grow gardens and healthier bodies—and maybe teach their parents a thing or two.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from The Hawaii Independent

Mellon-Hawaii fellows named
May 18, 2010

Two Big Island scholars have been selected as 2010 Mellon-Hawaii Doctoral Fellows in recognition of their commitment to the advancement of scholarship on Hawaiian cultural and natural environments, Hawaiian language, history, politics and society.

» read more

Used with permission from the Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Kekaha boy awarded Mellon-Hawai‘i Fellowship
May 13, 2010

Keao NeSmith has been selected as a 2010 Mellon-Hawai‘i Doctoral Fellow in recognition of his commitment to the advancement of scholarship on Hawaiian cultural and natural environments, Hawaiian language, history, politics and society, a press release states.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from The Garden Island

Big Isle trio awarded BELL Rhode Island scholarships
May 10, 2010

The Kohala Center congratulates its three 2010 summer scholars — Megan Saks, Alyssa Evans, and Roya Sabri.

Saks and Evans will travel to Narragansett, R.I. to participate in the BELL (Brown Environmental Leadership Lab) Sustainable Development Program.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii247.com

Hawaiian scholars scoop top US fellowships to study at Waikato
May 10, 2010

In a New Zealand first, two Native Hawaiian scholars have won top US awards to complete their PhD studies at the University of Waikato.

The prestigious Mellon-Hawai’i doctoral fellowships are supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and Kamehameha Schools, and are each worth US$40,000 (NZ$56,000) for the 2010-11 academic year, starting in September.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from the University of Waikato

Native Hawaiian scholars awarded Mellon-Hawaii Fellowships
May 9, 2010

Five Hawaiian scholars have been selected as 2010 Mellon-Hawaii Doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellows in recognition of their commitment to the advancement of scholarship on Hawaiian cultural and natural environments, Hawaiian language, history, politics, and society.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii247.com

Student scientists riding HI-MOES
By Karin Stanton
May 9, 2010

The future of Hawaii’s natural resources looks like it might be in good hands.

For the better part of a year, hundreds of West Hawaii middle and high school students have been studying bay and watershed ecosystems through HI-MOES (Hawaii Island Meaningful Outdoor Experiences for Students) and finally got to share the findings of their research projects last week at a science conference in Kona.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii247.com

Making a Difference the Hawaiian Way
May 7, 2010

Visitors and Island residents received a special treat this morning thanks to the Kohala Center’s Cindi Punihaole.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from pacificislandparks.com

Nature, uninterrupted:
West Hawaii students examine various ecosystems

By Carolyn Lucas
May 5, 2010

Sofia Boucher's poem about Puu O Umi flawlessly captures the essence of nature thick with possibilities to wonder about, investigate, explore, discover and express.

» read more

Used with permission from the West Hawaii Today

The story of seed -- a living treasure
by Nancy Redfeather And Janis Wong
April 11, 2010

When you buy a packet of spinach seeds at the store and bury a handful in the soil, do you see the seed as a living, renewable and sustainable agricultural treasure? As possibly an heirloom to be lost?

» read more

Used with permission from the West Hawaii Today

Here's how to save seeds from your garden
by Russell T. Nagata
University Of Hawaii At Manoa, College Of Tropical Agriculture And Human Resources, Hawaii County Administrator
April 11, 2010

Whether you obtain seeds from the display rack at your favorite garden store, by perusing seed catalogs in either printed or electronic versions, or from friends and relatives, you may one day have a need to save seeds from your very own garden.

» read more

Used with permission from the Hawaii Tribune Herald

The story of seed far from finished
Visiting experts to trace epic saga at public talk on April 16
April 6, 2010

The story of seed -- from the wild to the engineered -- will be the focus of a free public lecture from 5:30-7 p.m. Friday, April 16, at the Outrigger Keauhou Beach Resort. The program will precede the Hua Ka Hua-Restore Our Seed Symposium.

» read more

Used with permission from the Hawaii Tribune Herald

Magazine Taps Hamabata as Up-And-Coming Leader
April 2010

Matt Hamabata, executive director of The Kohala Center, has been selected by Hawaii Business Magazine as one of Hawai‘i's next generation of movers and shakers.

» read more

Used with permission from the Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce


The story of seeds to be told

March 24, 2010

The story of seed — from the wild to the engineered — is the focus of a free public lecture from 5:30–7 p.m. Friday, April 16, at the Outrigger Keauhou Beach Resort preceding the Hua Ka Hua—Restore Our Seed Symposium.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii County News

Farming internships--Growing a green career
March 24, 2010
By Roger Harris And Diane Koerner

Reports have come out that farming will be the hottest green job for the next decade. Just how can our children tap into this job market?

Here on the Big Island, we have a need for local food sustainability that could be met by the growing crop of potential farmers who have been inspired by their school gardens, where they connect with the source of their food, grow it, harvest it and eat it themselves.

» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly

Fears Come True
Varroa mite quickly spreading

March 21, 2010
by Chelsea Jensen

Beekeepers of all sorts know they must find a way to coexist with the destructive parasite as varroa mites continue to spread across the Big Island.

» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

Wood Show brings in $5,000 for Kohala Watershed Partnership
March 12, 2010
By Special to West Hawaii Today

After tabulating nearly 300 votes made by the public during the recent Wood Show at Harbor Gallery, the People's Choice award-winner has been determined.

Perry Policiccio, of Hilo, has won the award for People's Choice for his entry titled "Life is Like a Bowl of Cherries." The piece was also purchased by a collector from California.

» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

In Brief - Schools
Waimea school garden receives award

March 10, 2010
By Local Sources

Malaai: The Culinary Garden of Waimea Middle School formally celebrated its fifth anniversary March 3 by accepting a prestigious Cooke Foundation Beautification Award for the organic garden which was once a Parker Ranch pasture. The award included a $5,000 gift to the school to help sustain the classroom garden.

» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

Aftershocks: Psuedo-Tsunamis and Food Insecurity in Hawai‘i
March 7, 2010
By Eric Holt Gimenez

A couple of my young and highly talented friends were winding down in the wee hours after their snapping GO LIVE! REAL FOOD performance in Waikiki when they got the news of the Chilean earthquake. They 'stood fixated on the flat screens, drinks in hand' as real time images of Chilean destruction were quickly followed by an official tsunami warning and a barrage of historic Hawaiian newsreel footage documenting the devastating tidal wave that hit Hilo back in 1947. After ordering an evacuation of coastal areas, the government advised people to stock up on a weeks worth of food. This is when hip-hop artists Jennifer Johns, Erwin Thomas and Lynnete Kaid learned a sobering fact:

There are only 3-5 days of food reserves available on the island. The land of lush tropical forests, sparkling waterfalls and deep, rich volcanic soils imports over 85% of its food. It is materially impossible for everyone to "stock up" on a week's food in Hawai‘i.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from The Huffington Post

Revitalizing the land of plenty with affordable housing
March 2, 2010
By Emily Lo

Hawaii Island is caught in a Catch 22 situation.

Although the island boasts a fertile landscape that can easily support a broad range of agriculture, 85-90 percent of food consumed is imported from the mainland.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from MIT News

20 For the Next 20
March 2010
By Jerry Burris, Cathy Cruz-George, Shara Enay, Dennis Hollier and Jason Ubay

Hawaii Business Magazine has chosen 20 people who will play a role in impacting Hawaii's future over the next 20 years.

...Colleagues describe Matthews Hamabata as the “then what?” guy because he has the brains, connections and vision to turn big ideas into reality.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii Business

Former Yale professor Matt Hambata named as one of 20 up-and-coming leaders
February 26, 2010
Cross Campus 2.26.10

Former Yale professor Matt Hamabata was named by Hawaii Business magazine as one of 20 up-and-coming leaders.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Yale News Daily

Hawaii Business names Hamabata up-and-coming leader
February 25, 2010
By Janis Wong

Matt Hamabata, executive director of The Kohala Center, has been selected by Hawaii Business magazine as one of Hawai'i's next generation of movers and shakers.

Hamabata is profiled in the magazine's March issue, "20 For The Next 20," as one of 20 up-and-coming leaders.

» read more

Used with permission from the Honolulu Advertiser

More than $180K to boost native culture on Big Island
February 17, 2010
Media Release

The Hawaii Tourism Authority is awarding more than $180,000 to Big Island-based programs aimed at perpetuating the Hawaiian culture.

The grants are among $600,000 spread statewide among 27 projects that are receiving the funds, the HTA said in announcing recipients of the Living Hawaiian Culture Program.

» read more

Used with permission from Hawaii Tribune Herald

Kaiser volunteers help out school gardens
February 9, 2010
Media Release

On Jan. 18, in honor of Martin Luther King (MLK), Jr., and his commitment to community service, doctors and staff from Kaiser Permanente joined hands with students, teachers, and volunteers to work in three school gardens around Hawaii Island.

“This is our way of giving back to our community,” said Dr. Jeffrey Tolan, Family Practice Physician at Kaiser Permanente’s Waimea Clinic.

» read more

Click here to read the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii 24/7.org

VIDEO: Pelekane Bay Watershed Project progresses
February 3, 2010
By David Corrigan

The Pelekane Bay Watershed Project is moving along here on the dry, leeward side of Kohala Mountain.

The Kohala Watershed Partnership recently took local media for a closer at the effort which is being funded with a $2.69 million federal stimulus through a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration coastal restoration grant.

» read more

Click here to read the article online and view the video.

Used with permission from Big Island Video News.com.

A Pelekane Bay kind of day
February 2, 2010
By Karin Stanton

What can $2.69 million in federal stimulus money buy? For the Pelekane Bay watershed restoration project, it means six fence builders and six nursery workers, as well as a field operations leader and a field technician working to build miles of fencing, transplant thousands of native plant species and weed out invasive species. It's a job for a laid-off construction worker, steady employment for a long-time plumber and career inspiration for a recent high school graduate excited about conservation. The program, run through The Kohala Center's Kohala Watershed Partnership, also means a job for a laid-off relative, and the encouraging of partnership volunteers to apply for the short-term, full-time jobs.

» read more

Click here to read the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii 24/7.org.

Stimulus money means jobs, watershed restoration
January 20, 2010
By Erin Miller

What can $2.69 million in federal stimulus money buy? For the Pelekane Bay watershed restoration project, it means six fence builders and six nursery workers, as well as a field operations leader and a field technician working to build miles of fencing, transplant thousands of native plant species and weed out invasive species. It's a job for a laid-off construction worker, steady employment for a long-time plumber and career inspiration for a recent high school graduate excited about conservation. The program, run through The Kohala Center's Kohala Watershed Partnership, also means a job for a laid-off relative, and the encouraging of partnership volunteers to apply for the short-term, full-time jobs.

» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today.

Volunteers at work
Kahakai Elementary garden gets a helping hand

January 19, 2010
By Erin Miller

The earthy smell of freshly turned soil mingled with the spicy, pepper scent of just-plucked basil Monday morning, as volunteers from Kaiser Permanente descended on the school's garden for weeding, pruning and picking.

» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today.

Farmers swap seeds, knowledge
January 6, 2010
By Alan D. Mcnarie

Hawai'i gets most of its food from somewhere else. And even when farmers or gardeners grow fruit or veggies here, their plants probably still started their lives elsewhere.

"Here in Hawai'i, as home producers and market farmers, we really have to buy our seed from somewhere else," says sustainable gardening activist Nancy Redfeather. "Most organic market farmers in Hawai'i buy their seed from Johnny's, which is in Maine."

In recent years, interest has grown in changing that fact.

» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly





Diana Duff's Master Gardener By-line

December 13, 2009
By Diana Duff

In August, a land-focused non-profit received over two million dollars from an ocean focused federal agency. It was the first time this agency had made such a large
investment in this type of project in Hawai‘i, signaling a new understanding of the intrinsic connection between land and sea. This project is unique in that the benefits to an historic bay will be a result of restoration efforts focused on land. For truly, what happens at the source point, our watersheds, has direct impact on the end point, our bays.

» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today.


'Bay Concert' Celebrates Kahaluu Bay, Kane

November 24, 2009
By Margaret Masunaga

The Bay Concert, a celebration of life at Kahaluu Bay, gave special recognition this year to artist, historian and author Herbert Kawainui Kane.

The fundraiser, sponsored by The Kohala Center, was Saturday, Nov. 21 at the Sheraton Keauhou Bay Resort & Spa.

Kane, a resident of Honaunau, was honored as a community leader at the very heart of the Hawaiian Renaissance and a celebration of all that is good in life.

Click here to read the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii 247.org.


The "Cool Factor" Bonds Youth and Farming
November/December 2009
By Andrea Dean

Dashiell Hammet was a famous detective novelist.
Dashiell Kuhr, of North Kohala, is the energetic, articulate, handsome (dare I say dashing) driving force behind the Hawai‘i Youth Agricu lture Program and the operations of Uluwehi Farm and Nursery, a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) farm in North Kohala.

The owners, Tom Baldwin and Shannon Casey, were looking for someone to help manage their two North Kohala permaculture farms. Tom was introduced to Dash through a mutual friend and thus was the beginning of a fruitful (and vegetable!) relationship. Dash, his wife Erika Shickle, and their baby son Cyrus came to North Kohala in early 2008 and the collaboration has grown into a unique CSA educational program.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission by Andrea Dean as published in Ke Ola Magazine.


Big Vision for the Big Island—Step by Natural Step
November 2009
By Andrea Dean

Envision this: You woke up this morning and had a delicious fruit salad comprised of all locally grown fruitsmango, papaya, banana, dragon fruitand topped with fresh cream from the local dairy, sprinkled with roasted macadamia nuts, and drizzled with organic honey. Feeling so energized by your colorful and flavorful breakfast, you walked the short distance to the local bus slop, where you caught the clean, quiet, hydrogen-powered bus to the airport. Your short interisland ftight on go! was powered by locally produced biofuel. Local farmers, scientists, politicians, and business leaders all came together and helped create a vibrant new economic sector by growing biofuel crops on marginal agricultural lands. Inexpensive leases and tax breaks make it all work financially.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission by Andrea Dean as published in Go!/Mokulele's in-flight magazine Innov8.



Yalies to study environment in Hawaii

November 11, 2009
By Katie Falloon

While many tourists imagine the island of Hawaii as a tropical paradise, it soon may no longer be able to support residents’ current standards of living. Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies professor Marian Chertow was awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service in October to study ways to help the island of Hawaii achieve food and energy self-reliance. Chertow and her team will work with the Kohala Center, a non-profit research and education organization, to study human impact on the environment over the past 200 years in the cities of Kailua-Kona and Hilo.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Yale Daily News.



Big Island Big Ideas
Local leaders chart six ways to revitalize the economy

November, 2009
By Shara Enay

“We’re a big island but a small community. That’s what makes Hawaii Island unique. It’s what binds the people and it’s what will get us through this recession. Not, no can. Can!” Mayor Billy Kenoi’s confidence is shared by a host of other Big Island leaders. Where outsiders see a crippled tourism industry, high unemployment and reduced real estate investment, these local leaders see lots of big projects starting or on the horizon, a community consensus that is stronger than ever, and an abundance of visionary but realistic ideas.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii Business.



Student Voices: From King Ferry to Kona corals
October 30, 2009

Courtney Couch is a Ph.D candidate at Cornell University and coordinator for the Coral Disease Working Group, one of six working groups within the Coral Reef Target Research and Capacity Building Program funded by the Global Environmental Facility and the World Bank. Couch, with the assistance of The Kohala Center, will conduct coral disease surveys and measure coral reef community structure at 11 sites in West Hawaii during the next three years.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii247.org.



Ideas by the bushel at meeting
Farmers, Kohala Center seek ag plan for Big Isle
October 29, 2009
by Nancy Cook Lauer

A nonprofit think tank is recommending Hawaii County take its agricultural base seriously by elevating an agriculture director to a Cabinet-level position and adding staff. Currently only one county employee, in the Department of Research and Development, handles all questions and requests about agriculture. The Kohala Center, which held a public meeting Wednesday night in Hilo to discuss an agriculture development plan for the county, is recommending at least three employees be hired to assist the director.

» read more

Used with permission from the Hawaii Tribune Herald.


National Science Foundation grant for revitalization study

October 25, 2009

Hilo and Kailua-Kona. How have these two Hawaii Island urban areas evolved in such different ways over the last 50 years?

Researchers at Yale University’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, the U.S. Forest Service in Hilo, and The Kohala Center, backed by a grant from the National Science Foundation, are going to take a stab at answering this question.

“Hawaii Island provides a model setting to test theories about human impacts on the earth system and about resource constraints on urban growth. Resource management issues are of critical concern for Hawaii Island,” said Marian Chertow, director of the industrial environmental management program at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from international society for industrial ecology.




Plan for growing our own
Nonprofit pushes ag development for isle

October 25, 2009
by Nancy Cook Lauer

Agriculture has been one of the linchpins of the Big Island economy. Yet with all the lip service county officials give agriculture and agricultural sustainability, they've been reluctant to put their money where their mouth is. In an era when it's more profitable to grow rooftops than radishes on prime farmland, when ranchettes are replacing the ranches of old, and paniolo are more often seen in parades than among the cattle, the statistics are sobering.

» read more

Used with permission from the Hawaii Tribune Herald
.



Planting 'Seeds of Hope' in the future
Supporters of isle's school garden program board cruise ship in Hilo to promote sustainability

October 21, 2009
By Terrie Henderson

School gardens on the Big Island are growing in popularity, and educators spearheading these initiatives hope that today's keiki will hoe the row towards a future of sustainability. Nancy Redfeather, Hawai'i Island School Garden Network project director, said hopes more will pop up and continue to blossom.

» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly.


What does it take to be carbon-neutral?
October 8, 2009

Students enrolled in the 2009 Cornell Earth and Environmental Systems (EES) Field Program experienced firsthand how to minimize their carbon footprint during their five months on the island. The students used solar water heating and monitored their electric and propane usage. They participated in a food cooperative and shopped at the farmers’ market to purchase locally grown fruits and vegetables, and they purchased grass-fed island beef as often as possible.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii247.org.

No Child Left Inside: Hawai'i Island School Gardens and the Kohala Center
September 22, 2009
By Jacoby Young on KanuHawaii.org

Beginning in 2001, the Kohala Center was created as an independent, not-for-profit center for research and education. The center has made it their mission "to respectfully engage the Island of Hawai'i as an extraordinary and vibrant research and learning laboratory for humanity". They go about this through a multitude of programs; The Mellon-Hawai'i Doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, Hawai'i Island Meaningful Environmental Education for Teachers (HI-MEET), the Hawai'i County Agriculture Development Plan, the Waimea Nature Camp for youth, and many more.

Click here to view the article online.



Stimulus funds devoted to Hawaii watershed restoration

September 21, 2009
By Karin Stanton

KAILUA, KONA, Hawaii — Pelekane Bay was a sheltered place where fish once thrived, fed by streams from Kohala Mountain. Today, the inland Pelekane watershed is overrun by nonnative plants and animals, allowing sediment to flow into the bay. Also, ranching, development, feral goats and wildfires have left the land mostly barren or covered with invasive fountain grass. A local partnership is using $2.7 million in federal stimulus money to restore the watershed, located on the northwest coast of the Big Island.

» read more

Used with permission from the Honolulu Advertiser.




Hawai'i Island School Garden Network is the featured Community Group on the Jack Johnson 'All at Once' Website!

Click here to see the Web site.

Oct. 16 luncheon celebrates school gardens program on World Food Day
September 16, 2009

The Kohala Center celebrates the 26th Annual World Food Day with a benefit "Seeds of Hope" luncheon for the Hawai'i Island School Garden Network (HISGN) from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. October 16 aboard the Golden Princess docked at Hilo Harbor. Reservations are required by September 30.

» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today.


Kohala Center sponsors benefit for school gardens
September 14, 2009

The Kohala Center celebrates the 26th Annual World Food Day with a benefit "Seeds of Hope" luncheon for the Hawai'i Island School Garden Network (HISGN) from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. October 16 aboard the Golden Princess docked at Hilo Harbor. Reservations are required by September 30. "Children's garden programs are sprouting and growing in schools all across Hawai'i Island," said Nancy Redfeather, HISGN project director.

» read more

Used with permission from the Honolulu Advertiser.

Stimulus Money Hits The Waves In Hawaii
September 13, 2009
In Hawaii, millions of dollars of stimulus money is going to restore marine and coastal habitats. Wilma Consul visits two of the sites and reports that these projects go a long way in helping ailing local economies as well as ailing marine habitats.

Click here to read more and access the clip online

Used with permission from NPR
.

Hamabata honored with Hookele leadership award
Hawaii Alliance of Nonprofit Organizations
September Newsletter

Matt Hamabata, executive director of The Kohala Center, has been recognized as a nonprofit leader in Hawaii who is making a difference in our community and honored with a 2009 Hookele award by the Hawaii Community Foundation and Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation. Hamabata has guided The Kohala Center from its
bare-bones founding in January 2001 to a $4.1 million organization in eight short years, based on the vision of building research and educational programs that help communities on the island and around the world to thrive — ecologically, economically, culturally, and socially.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from HANO.



Deadline for outdoor science education program Sept. 7

August 20, 2009

Big Island students and their teachers will have the chance this year to leave the classroom and study firsthand ahupuaa (watersheds) of West Hawaii. The Kohala Center is launching HI-MOES, or Hawaii Island Meaningful Outdoor Education for Students, an innovative hands-on science-based program that focuses on bay and watershed education in the watersheds of the Kona coast and Kohala Mountain.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii247.org.




Watershed restoration project underway
Auguat 20, 2009

The Pelekane Bay Watershed Restoration Project on the leeward coast of Kohala Mountain was officially launchedMondayinaceremony that included remarks by Sen. Daniel K. Inouye. To fund the project, the Kohala. Watershed Partnership (KWP) 'received $2.69 million in federal funds through a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) coastal restoration grant through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

» read more

Used with permission from North Hawaii News

Learning event at Puanui gardens
August 19, 2009

Experience agricultural sustainability as the Hawaiians practiced it for centuries at the Kohala Center's learning event at the Puanui Project in North Kohala from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 22. The Puanui Project works to understand the agricultural field system of leeward Kohala as cultivated by the Hawaiians and to apply that wisdom to furthering current agricultural sustainability. Its experimental fields, created for a National Science Foundation-funded research project, produce 'uala (sweet potato), kalo (taro), ko (sugarcane), and other plants that supported the Kohala population centuries ago.

» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly.

Inouye helps kick off Pelekane Bay restoration project
August 18, 2009
by Karin Stanton/Hawaii 247 Contributing Editor

Pelekane Bay is getting some much needed TLC, thanks to a dose a federal stimulus money. The restoration project kicked off Monday, Aug. 17 at an invite-only reception attended by U.S. Sen. Daniel K. Inouye. Pelekane Bay traditionally was a sheltered place for young fish to grow and mature, fed by streams from Kohala Mountain. The ancient heaiu of Puukohola National Historical Park overlook the bay, with Spencer’s Beach Park to the south and Kawaihae Harbor to the north.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii247.org.

Seed sharing: Public seed initiative gets federal funding to move forward with plan
August 12
By Terrie Henderson

The Hawaiian tradition to mahale with their neighbors didn't start with who's bringing the lau lau to the next beach party. Farmers sharing their crops with the community and giving back to the aina is real Hawaiian legacy, and that's just what the Kohala Center and its partners are hoping to re-invent with the public seed initiative. The "Hua Ka Kua - Restore Our Seed" program recently received a federal grant to move forward on planning a statewide effort to build the program, which basically encourages farmers, gardeners and seed experts to help each other to find the seed variety that will flourish in their particular climate, soil and market.

» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly.

Hamabata honored with Ho'okele leadership award
August 4, 2009

Matt Hamabata, executive director of The Kohala Center, has been recognized as a nonprofit leader in Hawai'i who is making a difference in our community and has been honored with a 2009 Ho'okele award by the Hawai'i Community Foundation and Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation. "Just as a steersman, ho'okele, is key to guiding a canoe successfully to its destination, this award recognizes the significant and often less visible role that a nonprofit leader plays in improving the quality of life for Hawai'i's people," said Christine Van Bergeijk, vice president of programs for the Hawai'i Community Foundation.

» read more

Used with permission from the Honolulu Advertiser.



Hawaii Public Radio
July 6, 2009

The Kohala Watershed Parnership has received $2.69-million dollars in federal stimulus funds to improve the condition of the Pelekane Bay Watershed. HPR's Sherry Bracken reports from the Big Island.

Listen to the report.

Used with permission from Hawaii Public Radio



Habitats getting help
Projects in Maunalua and Pelekane bays will receive $6.1 million in federal funding
July 1, 2009

Projects to restore Maunalua and Pelekane bays will receive $6.1 million as part of the federal economic stimulus package, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced yesterday. [Preview] Federal Money to Help Clean Local Waters [Preview] Economic stimulus money is coming to Hawaii to help our reefs by removing invasive algae from Maunalua Bay. [ Watch ] In partnership with KITV.com The funds will help restore marine and coastal habitats while providing 88 jobs in the state. The two projects were part of 50 national restoration projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

» read more

Used with permission from the Star Bulletin



Environmental Committee supports Kahalu‘u Bay Project
July, 2009

Editors note: The Chamber’s Environment & Natural Resources Committee has selected the Kahalu’u Bay Project as one area of focus for this fiscal year. Awareness, protection and education efforts by the committee will seek to compliment the efforts of the Project. KEAUHOU—How do we restore Kahalu‘u Beach Park, a significant community park dotted with archaeological sites and a rich cultural history, and protect its pristine ocean resources—while encouraging the nearly 400,000 visitors annually to enjoy it?

» read more

Excerpt taken from the Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce Newsletter 'Connections'



Hawaii shoreline restoration projects getting $6 million from NOAA
June 30, 2009

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will send more than $6 million in federal stimulus money to support two Hawaii projects dedicated to restoring shorelines. Advertisement On Oahu, NOAA announced today that The Nature Conservancy and Malama Maunalua's invasive algae removal project will receive $3.4 million in federal stimulus money to create 73 new jobs and restore marine habitat in Maunalua Bay. NOAA said it also will send $2.69 million in stimulus money to the Kohala Watershed Partnership as a coastal restoration grant to improve conditions at the Pelekane Bay watershed on the Big Island.

» read more

Used with permission from the Honolulu Advertiser




Women talk story of good times and bad
June 29, 2009

At age 12, Puanani Burgess had lived in 12 different places. It got to the point that her family never unpacked. One day, Burgess noticed her grandmother never moved and inquired why. The answer was "different time, different place, different situation." When her grandmother was 14 years old and living in Japan, a marriage broker negotiated a bride price with her father. No deal was reached. She stayed. A year later, the marriage broker returned, but she again stayed. The following year, her grandmother, then 16, was sold to a skinny, tall Japanese man in Hawaii, a place she knew nothing about.

» read more

Used with permission from the West Hawaii Today




'Papayas and Bitter Melons' is a slice of life
June 21, 2009

Ups, downs of life focus of upbeat look at ohana power The ladies of "Papayas and Bitter Melons: Tales of the Bitter and Sweet," will be at the Keauhou Beach Resort Kalani Kai Grill from 1-2:30 p.m. Sunday, June 28, as part of La 'Ike Day at Kahalu'u Bay. Lucy Gay, Puanani Burgess, Ho'oipo DeCambra, Karen Young, Karen Hackler-Director, and Grace Caligtan of Oahu describe themselves as "community builders/activists/teachers/healers/friends who dive together into a lifetime of memories and surface bearing stories.

» read more

Used with permission from the Hawaii Tribune Herald




Spend a day at Hamakua Springs Farm
June 21, 2009

It's part of Kohala Center's 'Cool Farms, Hot Lunches' fun learning series Farm-fresh lettuce. Tomatoes and cucumbers straight off the vine. The Kohala Center's "Cool Farms, Hot Lunches" learning events continue with a visit to Hamakua Springs Country Farms with owner Richard Ha from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, June 27. Ha and his wife, June, operate Hamakua Springs Country Farms (formerly Kea'au Bananas). The 600-acre hydroponic farm on the Hamakua coast produces tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers, and other specialty vegetables for island markets, restaurants, and top local chefs.

» read more

Used with permission from the Hawaii Tribune Herald




Students spend Hawaii semester planting trees, studying environment
June 16, 2009

For the last six weeks of their semester in Hawaii, students in the Cornell Earth and Environmental Systems Field Program fanned out across the island to work as interns for various public and private entities. The students got their hands dirty gathering and analyzing soil samples; studying the effects of sedimentation on nearshore coral reefs; helping visitors to master proper reef “etiquette” before snorkeling; and carefully calculating their own carbon footprint by counting everything from their propane usage to the volume of local foods they consumed during their five months on the island.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii247.org.



Going green at the Student Congress on Sustainability
June 16, 2009

GOING GREEN—Waimea resident Doug Teeple (right), who has not been to a gas station in more than two years, shares his e-Ghia with students. Teeple, a systems software engineer at Canada France Hawaii Telescope, converted his gas-powered car to full electric. He was one of several workshop presenters during the Second Annual Student Congress on Sustainability held June 11-14 at Hawaii Preparatory Academy. HPA and The Kohala Center sponsored the free event, which was attended by about 80 students and teachers from Maui, Oahu, and the Big Island.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii247.org.



Seeding the future for local farms
Hawaii Island Seed Exchange shares in gardening success June 3, 2009
By: Roger Harris And Diane Koerner

Experience an island community coming together to literally share the seeds of their gardening success and knowledge. It's happening at the 7th Annual Hawai'i Island Seed Exchange, Saturday, June 13, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Amy B. H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in Captain Cook. Gardeners know that one of the rules of success is to plant what grows well locally -- just look in your neighbors' gardens. And being able to plant their seeds is a special bonus. So, come early and share your seeds, cuttings, roots, and keiki plants at the Exchange to help build community food self-reliance, biodiversity, and health. (No potted plants will be allowed to prevent spreading the little fire ant.)

» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly.



Cleaning Kahaluu
Two dozen volunteers remove garbage at beach
May 24, 2009
by Chelsea Jensen

"My hands are full of cigarettes. Look at how much there is ... look ... There's so much cigarettes over here," said Justin Kenoi, 9, as he brought handfuls of cigarette butts, bottle caps and other refuse found strewn about Kahaluu Beach Park to a large garbage bag. About 25 people attended "La Ike Day at Kahaluu Bay" Saturday morning at the park's main pavilion. Mayor Billy Kenoi, along with his family, joined in the day helping community members clean up the 4 acre county park.

» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today.



Researchers study human impact on nature
By KARIN STANTON
Associated Press KAILUA-KONA

A Big Island think tank is leading a 20-year study focused on the intersection of human and natural systems. The Kohala Center, an independent academic institution, is partnering with Yale University to research the development of a long-range industrial ecosystem model that could have global implications. The study will monitor some 77 indicators in the three broad areas of environment, economy and community to determine how human actions influence natural resources. The results will provide ideas, methods and tools to use as a foundation to better manage and sustain communities.

» read more

Used with permission from Associated Press



Artists go with the flow for new Waimea show
May 8, 2009

Mixed-media exhibit opens on Sunday at Kahilu The varied physical and cultural landscapes of the waters flowing through Waimea from Kohala Mountain to the ocean are the inspiration for an invitational artists' event from Sunday, May 10, through June 12 at Kahilu Theatre. Kahe Mau Ka Wai A Waimea: Forever Shall the Waters of Waimea Flow reflects on the enduring waters of Waimea and cultural landscape through art and sharing.

» read more

Used with permission from the Hawaii Tribune Herald




Remembering Hawai‘i’s future by recognizing its traditions at Kahalu‘u and Keauhou
April/May 2009
by Matt Hamabata

Hanau ka ’Uku-ko’ako’a, hanau kana, he ’Ako’ako’a, puka (Born was the coral polyp, born was the coral, came forth.) Thus recounts Martha Warren Beckwith’s translation of the Kumulipo, the chant of Hawaiian origins, signifying na kanaka (Hawaiian/ humankind’s) relation to the natural environment and recently shared with marine scientists from around the world who convened at Kahalu‘u and Keauhou.

» read more

Used with permission from Ke Ola Magazine



Native Species Art Hike - Kohala
Island Events

Saturday, May 9, 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Native Species Art Hike - Kohala with Melora Purell, Coordinator for the Kohala Watershed Partnership. This unique art hike is for amateur and professional artists of all ages who plan to submit artwork for the juried show “Hawai’i Nei 2009″ held June 13 to August 2. The exhibition will feature artwork in any medium that highlights native flora and fauna (those not introduced by humans) found from ridge to reef.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from the Big Island Chronicle




Kohala Center’s ‘Cool Farms, Hot Lunches’ Program Commences With A Visit To Kawanui Farm On April 25
April 6, 2009

The first delectable learning event of The Kohala Center’s “Cool Farms, Hot Lunches” is a visit to Kawanui Farm with owners Nancy Redfeather and Gerry Herbert from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, April 25, 2009. The Kohala Center designed “Cool Farms, Hot Lunches” as a way for participants to connect with one another, with cultural and scientific experts, and with Hawai‘i Island’s natural, cultural, and spiritual landscapes.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from the Big Island Chronicle




Kohala nui
Education, environment and empowerment on the Big Island.
March 11, 2009
by Andrea Dean

In 1999, Five Mountains Hawai‘i, a community health
non-profit group on Hawai‘i Island, facilitated an ambitious community education and planning process. Faced with a rising tide of health and social problems, residents were asked “What would make us a happier and healthier community?” The community responded with three top priorities: increase educational attainment for youth and adults, increase the ability of local people to qualify for available jobs and diversify the economy.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Honolulu Weekly



Workshop held for managing, developing coral health strategies
February 18, 2009
b
y Subashini Ganesan

Is coral disease a threat? This was the focal point of the recent weeklong Pan-Pacific Coral Health and Disease Workshop at the Outrigger Keauhou Beach Resort. Biologists, scientists, professors, graduate students and managers gathered from across the mainland, Hawai'i and the Pacific islands to share data and compare information in an effort to understand coral reef deterioration.

» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly




Hope and Change in Our Own Backyard
February 5, 2009
b
y Subashini Ganesan

In keeping with our national desire to embrace hope and change, I will dedicate the next few weeks to writing about organizations that create opportunities for the Hawaiian Islands. Although some of these organizations are based on Hawai‘i Island, they may serve as an inspiration for program development here on Maui.

» read more

Used with permission from MauiWeekly.com




Scientists discuss coral reef health
February 8, 2009
by Karin Stanton

More than three dozen scientists, researchers and reef management experts met last week on the Big Island to try to kickstart a Pacific coral disease network. Scientists at the four day Pan-Pacific Coral Health and Disease Workshop, sponsored by the World Bank's coral disease working group and hosted by The Kohala Center, discussed data collected across the Indo-Pacific region and methods for integrating microbiology and ecology.

» read more

Used with permission the Hawaii Tribune Herald



Scholarships offered for Cornell and Brown summer programs

Wednesday, February 4, 2009

The Kohala Center invites high school students to apply for scholarships to summer engineering and environmental science programs at Cornell and Brown universities. Applications are due Feb. 28 for the Cornell CATALYST Academy's one-week residential engineering program and for the Brown University Environmental Leadership Lab, or BELL, this summer.

» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today.




The Kohala Center awarded 2008 Environmental Education Grant for Kahalu'u Bay Project
January 2009


» read more


The year that was
January 1, 2009

By Rob Parsons

The past year was all about change, as exemplified by Barack Obama's presidential campaign. The call for change delineated some prevailing Rob Report themes: biofuel debates; renewable energy possibilities; water allocation and legal brouhahas; local food "sovereignty," responsible island planning and political leadership; and the over-riding theme of living sustainably in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Maui Time Weekly.

Fellowships for Native Hawaiian Scholars
December 31, 2008


The Mellon-Hawaii Doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowship Program provides Native Hawaiian scholars the opportunity to complete their dissertations or to publish original research. Applications for the 2009-10 fellowship program are being accepted by The Kohala Center.

» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today.

Fellowships for Native Hawaiian Scholars
December 30, 2008

By The Kohala Center

The Mellon-Hawaii Doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowship Program provides Native Hawaiian scholars the opportunity to complete their dissertations or to publish original research. Applications for the 2009-2010 fellowship program are being accepted by The Kohala Center.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Guava Bee.

Blessings upon all
December 28, 2008

By Carol Yurth

Happy New Year. May this year bring you unimagined blessings! Here's a year-end message from Matt Hamabata, Ph.D, entitled "Paradoxically, a Time of Opportunity and Optimism."

» read more

Used with permission from Hawaii Tribune Herald.



Growing Trend
December, 2008

By Shara Enay

IT’S NO SECRET: Hawaii is facing a farmer shortage, which could one day cripple the state’s local agriculture industry. That’s why for the past year, Nancy Redfeather, executive director of the Hawaii Island School Gardens Network, has been working closely with Big Island parents and educators to get students interested in farming by creating their own on-site gardens.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii Business.


Saturday workshop focuses on growing food
Wednesday, November 19, 2008


In the last year, the Hawaii Island School Garden Network has expanded to serve school gardens in communities around the island. There are currently 45 projects, at varying stages of development, participating in the Garden Network.

» read more


Used with permission from West Hawaii Today.



Field of Dreams - Why Big Island farmers are key to a sustainable state economy
November, 2008
By Shara Enay

Friends of Richard Ha, president of Hamakua Springs Country Farm, describe him as the ultimate Big Island boy: humble, a little bit country and deeply passionate about the place he calls home. When he started out as a modest banana farmer more than 30 years ago, he had simple goals: raise his crops and provide for his family.

» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii Business.



A guide for volunteering out

Sunday October 26, 2008
by Bobby Command

"Preserving Paradise: Opportunities in Volunteering for Hawai'i's Environment." by Kirsten Whatley. Ever since humans have been in Kona, Kahalu'u Bay has been a community focal point. Its fertile soils and water supply once supported a major village of Native Hawaiians, and today snorkeling and surfing attract 400,000 users a year.

» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today.



Hawaiian park reborn, thanks to UW students
Thursday, July 10, 2008

By Catherine O'Donnell

For Iain Robertson, a UW landscape architecture professor, Kahaluʻu Beach Park turned out to be one of the most fascinating projects he's ever worked on.
» read more

Used with permission from University Week, the faculty/staff newspaper at the University of Washington.



Thinking Big
Tuesday, July 01, 2008

By Shara Enay

Last year, the Big Island spent about $750 million on fossil fuels, despite the abundance of alternatives such as solar, wind and hydro energy right in its backyard, according to The Kohala Center…
» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii Business.



The new energy reality: Kanu Hawaiʻi asks forum attendees to be counted
Thursday, June 12, 2008

By Kristine Kubat

We know, it's The Kohala Center, again. Might as well get used to it. There's just no getting away from these leaders in the transition to Hawaiʻi's sustainable future if your mission is to document the trend.
» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly.



Reality check: Actuary advises islanders to cross their fingers
Thursday, June 12, 2008

By Kristin Kubat

It was a day-long gathering of experts as well as business and political players on the subject of Hawaiʻi's energy future and it began with a list of woes titled "Economic implications of the rising prices and diminishing supplies of liquid fossil fuel."
» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly.



Burning desire: No new oil-fired plants but HELCO's future is highly combustible
Thursday, June 12, 2008

By Kristine Kubat

They were assigned different topics by The Kohala Center, but private consultant Jim Lazar and new HELCO president Jay Ignacio both chose to focus on how the utility might, or might not, change in the face of the current oil crisis.
» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly.



A call to action: Former state energy director goes activist
Thursday, June 12, 2008

By Kristine Kubat

Maurice Kaya served the State of Hawaiʻi as the director of its Energy Division for 20 years. Working within the confines of a department primarily responsible for business, economic development and tourism, he became known for his stoic persona, perfected during the height of the controversy over geothermal development.
» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly.



Energy forum decries dependence on oil
Saturday, June 7, 2008

By Jim Quirk

HILO -- "Wake up! The crisis is upon us!"

Maurice Kaya, a strategic energy and management consultant, used these words during a Friday forum to raise awareness of Hawaii Island's energy crisis, which will worsen without effective government intervention.
» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today.



Energy freedom begins at home: Consumers can do what government will struggle with
Saturday, June 07, 2008

By Bret Yager

Energy experts and local lawmakers sounded the alarm on rising fuel prices Friday. Calling for greater energy self-sufficiency on Hawaiʻi Island.
» read more

Used with permission from Hawaii Tribune Herald.



Designing minds: The Kohala Center & ʻAno ʻano Aloha collaborate on Institute for Pacific Design
Wednesday, June 4, 2008

By Kristine Kubat

You hear it in boardrooms and government chambers, classrooms and coffee shops, the word 'sustainability' is in standard usage when discussing the future and it seems this island has attracted an exceptionally high number of people who not only believe in the concept but feel compelled to make it a reality.
» read more

Used with permission from Big Island Weekly.



Protecting Kahaluu Bay: Interpretive signs attempt to create awareness, provoke action
Wednesday, September 26, 2007

By Carolyn Lucas

A delicate balancing act is afoot to protect the resources at Kahaluu Bay while trying to bring people closer to the wildlife and appreciate the sacredness of this place.
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Used with permission from West Hawaii Today.



Kahaluu Beach Park to get fresh coat of paint: Volunteers needed for the next two Thursdays
Monday, March 19, 2007

By Carolyn Lucas

Kahaluu Beach Park's main pavilion is getting a facelift this week. Hawaii County Department of Parks and Recreation recently gave The Kohala Center and University of Hawaii Sea Grant Extension Service permission to paint the building, benches and tables.
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Used with permission from West Hawaii Today.



A Living Laboratory - July 13, 2006
by Kathy G. Rawle

On the mainland, summer camp is a chance for kids to experience environments different from home: sunshine, swimming, outdoor games and cooking out. But here on the Big Island — where all that is available year round and close by — what's the point of camp?
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Team on Big Isle Examines Prospects for Industrial Ecology - March 13, 2006
by Kathy G. Rawle

A group of Yale scholars is studying how the Big Island can better use its resources and industrial waste. Marian Chertow, director of Yale University's Industrial Environmental Management Program, and seven of her postgraduate students are spending a week on the Big Island gathering data about the island's energy, materials, waste and water systems.
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Program Teaches Kids About Art, Science and Health - February 23, 2006
by Ron Eland

Through March 2, local artist Peter Kowalke will be showing his recent collection of paintings and prints, titled "Hawi Horses and Beach Faces" at MacArthur & Company.
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